[[ Audible ]] Red Earth, White Lies: Native Americans and the Myth of Scientific Fact Author Vine Deloria Jr. – Paydayloansnsi.co.uk

Red Earth, White Lies: Native Americans and the Myth of Scientific Fact You have to work to get past the first few chapters but once you do it is worth it He presents a lot of though provoking and interesting information. Structurally well written but rife with bitterness understandable , conspiracy theories, wishful thinking, pseudoscience, red herrings, ad hominem attacks and logical fallacies.I approached this book hoping to learn about another culture s thinking and traditions but found little but an attempt to substitute mythology as fact for reasoned, evidence based investigation.When the author gloated that the impact of comet Shoemaker Levy 9 on Jupiter was vindication for Immanuel Velikovsky s unfounded Structurally well written but rife with bitterness understandable , conspiracy theories, wishful thinking, pseudoscience, red herrings, ad hominem attacks and logical fallacies.I approached this book hoping to learn about another culture s thinking and traditions but found little but an attempt to substitute mythology as fact for reasoned, evidence based investigation.When the author gloated that the impact of comet Shoemaker Levy 9 on Jupiter was vindication for Immanuel Velikovsky s unfounded and speculative Worlds in Collision , I immediately saw where this tome was headed From this point on in the book, I thought I was on some evangelical Christian web site reading refutations of evolution, the effect was similar.Academia and the science community are populated with imperfect humans but DeLoria s massive conspiracy theories regarding the suppression of Native American cosmology sounds like an ideological twin to the 911 Truther crowd Or the idiotic mental primitives of Ayn Rand idolaters.No doubt some academics do did approach archaeology with a white, Western European Christian bias, bent on vindicating their own biases and cultural superiority But the massive conspiracy theory here drips with bitterness and substitutes an equally inane theory of its own.I rarely do not finish books, but after 2 3 s of the book refuting cosmology, physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, paleontology, archaeology and physical evidence, I could not go on I got whatever message the author intended.It is curious that the book does not mention genetics at all, the word does not appear in the index at all Genetic research at the time this book was written still had enough evidence to trace groups of people to their roots Native Americans today resist genetic testing because it might refute their assertion that they originated on Turtle island Sorry, we white Europeans had to get over our Biblical mythology, time for the rest of you to do the same Genetics these days could render this book as useless, boring and ridiculous.Utilizing the same arguments as Young Earth Creationists and other religious apologists, this book refutes all attempts at using evidence based research and substitutes the author s desires and cultural myths without a shred of evidence except the elders told us , therefore it must be true.Most myth contains some remnant of actual events but not this much Great book if you want to substitute indigenous tribes cultural myths for science and slap the White European Man in the face He raises valid concerns about biases in anthropology but then throws out the entire scientific edifice as the solution You may as well read books from the creationist Discovery Institute or log on to Young Earth Creationist web sites and get the same effect as this sadly useless tract I picked this up while with some friends and thought Oh dear,ammo for everyone who thinks I m a crazy leftist Well, that was true Listen, there s some things in here that I m not sure are so accurate But academic orthodoxy is always reluctant to question itself, and power structures impose meanings and explanations on the people they oppress which are often absurdly and patently false It s been this way for far too long, and it s good to question and poke fun at the vain and self sat I picked this up while with some friends and thought Oh dear,ammo for everyone who thinks I m a crazy leftist Well, that was true Listen, there s some things in here that I m not sure are so accurate But academic orthodoxy is always reluctant to question itself, and power structures impose meanings and explanations on the people they oppress which are often absurdly and patently false It s been this way for far too long, and it s good to question and poke fun at the vain and self satisfied establishment Medicine, which use to spit all over the use of herbs as they poisoned their patients with mercury, now scours the world to patent traditional indigenous medicines and charge the same people exorbitant rates to use their own plants Deloria does not dwell on this as much, but my point is that we need to be questioning power structures and the explanations they hand down This book does, and I liked it quite a bit The Bering Strait Theory is nonsense, argues Deloria Indians did not migrate across a land bridge from Eurasia to the Americas during the Ice Age, as Western archeologists claim Deloria exposes the flaws of this popular migration theory and shows that it does not even stand up on its own scientific terms Deloria also blasts the arrogance of Western anthropologists who purport to knowabout the origins of American Indians than the Indians themselves The author points out that not one myt The Bering Strait Theory is nonsense, argues Deloria Indians did not migrate across a land bridge from Eurasia to the Americas during the Ice Age, as Western archeologists claim Deloria exposes the flaws of this popular migration theory and shows that it does not even stand up on its own scientific terms Deloria also blasts the arrogance of Western anthropologists who purport to knowabout the origins of American Indians than the Indians themselves The author points out that not one myth, legend, story or account exists within American Indian folklore to corroborate the Bering Strait theory This book is a critique of Western scientific thought as it relates to American Indians Deloria examines the influence of Christian ideology on Western science and the Eurocentrism it promotes while pretending to be objective He also questions the theory of evolution, carbon dating and other paragons of Western science They took basically a good informative book and just addedwords than neccessary. Vine Deloria pulls the curtain on Western epistemology, revealing science s foolish perpetuation of unquestioned philosophical mishaps la Descartes and friends all the way to its current transmission of knowledge, i.e., the security of tenure amongst academics.From this, he also fleshes out a brilliant expos of science s premises which allow the marginalization and genocide of Indigenous peoples and voices.The majority of the book is concrete case studies questioning scientific dogma fr Vine Deloria pulls the curtain on Western epistemology, revealing science s foolish perpetuation of unquestioned philosophical mishaps la Descartes and friends all the way to its current transmission of knowledge, i.e., the security of tenure amongst academics.From this, he also fleshes out a brilliant expos of science s premises which allow the marginalization and genocide of Indigenous peoples and voices.The majority of the book is concrete case studies questioning scientific dogma from an American Indian perspective, however, the real goods lie in the first three chapters, where Deloria makes his profound theoretical claims challenging the fundamental tenents of Western epistemology Mind blown What an important book. Overall a good book that challenges conventional thinking Not sure if modern tech dispels Deloria s assertions but I think his commentary on the dismissal of Native American oral histories is on point. This book should be on every college reading list, but it won t be, as it offers a new and critical perspective on institutionalized knowledge Even if when you read it you don t subscribe to Deloria s well researched and clear cut theories which when presented are pretty hard to argue with , you will still come away with something worthwhile And that s a new way of seeing Deloria asks us all to suspend group thought and use our minds, all of our brain capacity, to reason out hypotheses, theo This book should be on every college reading list, but it won t be, as it offers a new and critical perspective on institutionalized knowledge Even if when you read it you don t subscribe to Deloria s well researched and clear cut theories which when presented are pretty hard to argue with , you will still come away with something worthwhile And that s a new way of seeing Deloria asks us all to suspend group thought and use our minds, all of our brain capacity, to reason out hypotheses, theories, scientific method He dares us to remove cultural blinders and step outside the realm of institutionalized thinking, to stop taking for end all, be all gospel any and all information presented to us by the experts in the field simply because we are told they are such This is a treatise on critical thinking, a call to arms to identify and eradicate the persistence of incestuous interpretation of facts Mandatory reading for ALL if we as a people would like to progress and evolve beyond our current boundaries Another good read Of Bakelite, bicycles and bulbs Speaks to our propensity of retroactive distortion when we look to interpret the past and it s inventions Describes how our current modern outlook, and the fact that we already have a spoiler alert knowledge of the product finally invented, prevents us from seeing the benefits of the process and therefore inhibits our current inventive minds Vine Deloria, Jr leading Native American scholar and author of the best selling God is Red, addresses the conflict between mainstream scientific theory about our world and the ancestral worldview of Native Americans Claiming that science has created a largely fictional scenario for American Indians in prehistoric North America, Deloria offers an alternative view of the continent s history as seen through the eyes and memories of Native Americans Further, he warns future generations of scientists not to repeat the ethnocentric omissions and fallacies of the past by dismissing Native oral tradition as mere legends


About the Author: Vine Deloria Jr.

Vine Victor Deloria, Jr was an American Indian author, theologian, historian, and activist He was widely known for his book Custer Died for Your Sins An Indian Manifesto 1969 , which helped generate national attention to Native American issues in the same year as the Alcatraz Red Power Movement From 1964 1967, he had served as executive director of the National Congress of American Indians, increasing tribal membership from 19 to 156 Beginning in 1977, he was a board member of the National Museum of the American Indian, which now has buildings in both New York City and Washington, DC.Deloria began his academic career in 1970 at Western Washington State College at Bellingham, Washington He became Professor of Political Science at the University of Arizona 1978 1990 , where he established the first master s degree program in American Indian Studies in the United States After ten years at the University of Colorado, Boulder, he returned to Arizona and taught at the School of Law.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Subscribe US Now