[Audible] Lovesong Author Alex Miller – Paydayloansnsi.co.uk

Lovesong From the beginning we know the ending of this book, although not how it came to be, or why it is as it is At first I really liked this story, but from about half way through I became a little impatient with it.I found the main character, Sabiha, difficult to relate to, as her greatest desire in life is very different to any of mine, although I still felt an empathy for her in her struggles with her dream I felt as though the author madeof events in the story than he needed to I was rea From the beginning we know the ending of this book, although not how it came to be, or why it is as it is At first I really liked this story, but from about half way through I became a little impatient with it.I found the main character, Sabiha, difficult to relate to, as her greatest desire in life is very different to any of mine, although I still felt an empathy for her in her struggles with her dream I felt as though the author madeof events in the story than he needed to I was ready to move on and felt irritated by the fact that he was still harping on about certain things.I thought the story was clever, and the way it was written was also interesting.Overall, I enjoyed this read, and would happily readof this author I listened to this as an audiobook, but I don t feel that listening to it affected my response to the story as I sometimes find audiobooks can do A beautiful style of writing I enjoyed every word The rhythm of the story, a north african harmony, coupled with a quiet yet intriguing pace, matched nicely with my desire to know what was going to happen next I m lucky to own the book, a traditional printed hardback, a lovely tangible thing Great cover, well considered layout accompanying a really good story. Alex Miller s beautiful Lovesong is anything but a simple love story Ken, a retired novelist returns home from an extended stay in Venice to find his neighborhood changed There is a new pastry shop run by Sabiha, a lovely woman with an air of sorrow Ken befriends her husband, John, and listens as John tells their story.In Paris many years earlier, John took a wrong train and then was caught in a sudden rainstorm Taking shelter in a nearby caf , he met Sabiha, a chance encounter that would ch Alex Miller s beautiful Lovesong is anything but a simple love story Ken, a retired novelist returns home from an extended stay in Venice to find his neighborhood changed There is a new pastry shop run by Sabiha, a lovely woman with an air of sorrow Ken befriends her husband, John, and listens as John tells their story.In Paris many years earlier, John took a wrong train and then was caught in a sudden rainstorm Taking shelter in a nearby caf , he met Sabiha, a chance encounter that would change the course of their lives They marry, run the caf , live happily enough However, John always intended to return to Australia and resume his career as a teacher Sabiha, feeling that once she moved to Australia she would never leave, refused to go until she was able to take her child to Tunisia to meet her father However, the two remain childless and in limbo As time passes, John s regret over his failed plans is matched in intensity by Sabiha s terror of aging When she learns her father is dying, the idea that she might die childless becomes unbearable.This personal crisis is set in the larger complex situation of two people from different cultures making a life together in a third There is no question that John and Sabiha love each other nonetheless, they are at an impasse that could destroy their marriage There is an elegiac note throughout Lovesong As usual, Miller s language is deceptively spare, slowly building in emotional power The climax, while not unexpected, is deeply moving.As Ken listens to John tell their story, he finds himself irresistibly drawn to its narrative possibilities Lovesong becomesthan a love story it becomes a novel about the nature of stories For Sabiha, a story is about company For John, it s an act of confession But it s therapeutic qualities benefit the listener as much as the teller, as Ken attests A story is also a gift Ken considers John s story to be too much a gift from the gods for him to pass it up even when he learns that John has ambitions to write it himself This raises the question that is not precisely answered just who owns a story Lovesong is the kind of novel that will have you thinking and feeling long after you finish it It starts off promising but deterioates page by page Lovesong also seems an inappropriate title the epitome of selfishness or screwing the spineless would beaccurate Only love for the self in this one. Yay, I finally managed to get through this rather turgid examination of a marriage between a spineless and uninteresting male, John, and Sabiha, possibly the most self centred and destructive female protagonist I ve ever had the misfortune of encountering in literature Despite beautiful passages of prose, I felt that this story could a be about 150 pages shorter page after relentlessly dull page of Sabiha s obsession with her unconceived child and b how much better a genius like Raymond Car Yay, I finally managed to get through this rather turgid examination of a marriage between a spineless and uninteresting male, John, and Sabiha, possibly the most self centred and destructive female protagonist I ve ever had the misfortune of encountering in literature Despite beautiful passages of prose, I felt that this story could a be about 150 pages shorter page after relentlessly dull page of Sabiha s obsession with her unconceived child and b how much better a genius like Raymond Carver could have done with this story idea.This book had me running the full gamut of emotions from the first 80 odd pages which I loved when the character of Houria figured prominently to the growing hatred toward Sabiha and her selfish and totally self absorbed motivations and the absolute lack of respect for the main male protagonist, John who was nothingthan a doormat For a book set in different locations, Paris, Melbourne and a bit of Tunisia, never at any time did I get the feeling I was there It felt suffocatingly insular One of the most interesting relationships in the book, that of the writer Ken and his daughter Clare, for mine was underdeveloped and ultimately unsatisfying much to the detriment of the overall story This book began to feel like a millstone around my neck as I was determined to finish it given it was highly recommended by a number of friends of mine I began to dread the thought of readingof it, desperately wanting to get back to my TBR pile I m glad I red it though as it is important sometimes to read something that clashes so much with your own values 1.5 stars at best and only that for some beautifully written passages This is my first review Primarily as this book frustrated methan any other, and secondly my understanding of its themes and point eludes me, and I feel the need to ventIt s a story about an allegedly famous writer returning from a self imposed retirement overseas, to find a pastry shop where the laundromat once was He becomes obsessed with the Tunisian lady of the store, Sabiha, and via means explained later begins learning of her tale from her Australian husband, John.It s written This is my first review Primarily as this book frustrated methan any other, and secondly my understanding of its themes and point eludes me, and I feel the need to ventIt s a story about an allegedly famous writer returning from a self imposed retirement overseas, to find a pastry shop where the laundromat once was He becomes obsessed with the Tunisian lady of the store, Sabiha, and via means explained later begins learning of her tale from her Australian husband, John.It s written well, but I just didn t understand the why of any of it Why Sabiha loved John, and why John loved Sabiha Why John seemed to lack any motivations of any kind Why Sabiha was her father s favourite daughter Why she seemed to be vacant of any defining characteristics in her personality with the exception of the primary plot point of the book something which isakin to the desire for a material possession than something that is a unique part of who she is as a person Sabiha s aunt Houria and her husband Dom are probably the most rounded and relatable characters, yet they comprise a minuscule amount of the book.There were no character arcs, no changed perceptions No one developed I could not empathise with any of the primary characters in spite of the long passages dedicated to their internal thoughts, which generally revolved around being ignorant, contemplating doing something, then not doing it, and no one in the book seeming to care about anything they were doing.I ll leave it at that for now I hope this isn t considered to contain spoilers A book I tolerated and respected, but did not enjoy on really any level Having read Journey to the Stone Country in an Australian Literature course last year, I was interested to see how this one went I did not see it as a love song but the rather bleak, slightly ironical fantasy of a middle aged man I would have likeddepth and humour in all of the main characters, although there was potential for kindness in some The tentative treatment of others made me wonder whether their cruelty was meant to be seen as such Promising settings for both felt dull an Having read Journey to the Stone Country in an Australian Literature course last year, I was interested to see how this one went I did not see it as a love song but the rather bleak, slightly ironical fantasy of a middle aged man I would have likeddepth and humour in all of the main characters, although there was potential for kindness in some The tentative treatment of others made me wonder whether their cruelty was meant to be seen as such Promising settings for both felt dull and under utilised The rather cloying intimacies in both made me squirm, as did warm and fuzzy repetitions of a drink of tea in Journey to the Stone Country and sweet pastries in Lovesong While prepared to get through novels such as these, I wantthan domestic homily and characterisation Australian literature seems a little bogged down with sentimental family sagas, fictionalised historical tragedies, and rather insipid soul searching Try Carpentaria by Alexis Wright and The Hunter by Julia Leigh And anything by Christos Tsiolkas All that said, there are an awful lot of Australian novels yet to read, especiallyrecent ones Seeking shelter in a Parisian cafe from a sudden rainstorm, John Patterner meets the exotic Sabiha and his carefully mapped life changes forever Resonant of the bestselling Conditions of Faith, Alex Miller s keenly awaited new novel tells the deeply moving story of their lives together, and of how each came undone by desireStrangers did not, as a rule, find their way to Chez Dom, a small, rundown Tunisian cafe on Paris distant fringes Run by the widow Houria and her young niece, Sabiha, the cafe offers a home away from home for the North African immigrant workers working at the great abattoirs of Vaugiraud, who, like them, had grown used to the smell of blood in the air But when one day a lost Australian tourist, John Patterner, seeks shelter in the cafe from a sudden Parisian rainstorm, the quiet simplicities of their lives are changed forever John is like no one Sabiha has met before his calm grey eyes promise her a future she was not yet even aware she wanted Theirs becomes a contented but unlikely marriage a marriage of two cultures lived in a third and yet because they are essentially foreigners to each other, their love story sets in train an irrevocable course of tragic eventsYears later, living a small, quiet life in suburban Melbourne, what happened at Vaugiraud seems like a distant, troubling dream to Sabiha and John, who confides the story behind their seemingly ordinary lives to Ken, an ageing, melancholy writer It is a story about home and family, human frailties and passions, raising questions of morals and purpose questions have no simple answerLovesong is a simple enough story in many ways the story of a marriage, of people coming undone by desire, of ordinary lives and death, love and struggle but when told with Miller s distinctive voice, which is all intelligence, clarity and compassion, it has a real gravitas, it resonates and is deeply moving Into the wonderfully evoked contemporary settings of Paris and Melbourne, memories of Tunisian family life, culture and its music are tenderly woven Almost everyone gushes on how beautiful and evocative this book is And how powerful the love is between Sabiha John Really Sabiha loves Sabiha most of all, Sabiha loves her imaginary little girl All that pining for this long lost baby really got into my nerves And I certainly didn t feel the love between the couple John needed to be a man haveof a spine That said, I did like the way the book is written but the story not so much Probably a littlecharacter development I t Almost everyone gushes on how beautiful and evocative this book is And how powerful the love is between Sabiha John Really Sabiha loves Sabiha most of all, Sabiha loves her imaginary little girl All that pining for this long lost baby really got into my nerves And I certainly didn t feel the love between the couple John needed to be a man haveof a spine That said, I did like the way the book is written but the story not so much Probably a littlecharacter development I thought Naomi from Naomi was the most selfish character in a book I ve ever read but Sabiha comes a very very close second 4.5 STARS I loved this book I was swept away by this story and all of its characters The story is simply written my favourite narrative style but contains so many hidden depths about love, relationships and how far people will go to get what they want Miller has never disappointed His characters were believable, vulnerable, fragile and yet resilient the full array of the human spirit and I was disappointed to leave them behind.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Subscribe US Now